February 16, 2012 | Vol. 42 No. 7

Students illustrate history of ‘revolution, reform’

Animal rights, the gold rush and 9-11 were just some of the topics students centered their projects around this year for History Day.

John S. Hagen
Gabrielle Galinski holds up her award for winning third place in the individual category during a History Day event at the Sheldon Museum on Monday.

Middle and high school students created projects based on the theme “Revolution, Reaction, Reform” for this year’s History Day. The projects were on display during the award ceremony on Monday night at the Sheldon Museum.

Students have the option of working individually or in groups to create an exhibit, a website, documentary, paper or performance about a historical event that relates to the theme. Winners go on to compete at the state competition. Last year several Haines students also attended the national competition in Maryland.

Each year the Sheldon Museum and the Chilkat Valley Historical Society sponsor the contest, provide research assistance and coordinate the judging. Exhibits remain in the upper gallery at the Sheldon Museum through Feb. 20.

Haines History Day 2012 Award Winners

Group Exhibit First: Rachel Haas and Faith Lockhart, Fighting for Animal Rights; second: Dawson Evenden and Ketch Jacobson, Flying the Last Frontier; third: Olivia Wing and Jordan Stigen, Grow it, Change it, Spread it

Individual Exhibit First: Corinna Hill, Crazy Talk; second: Kayla Yeoman, Work or Play; third: Gabrielle Galinski, Rushing to the Gold

Individual Paper First: Alexandria Chapin, A Fiery End Leads to a New Beginning

Group Documentary First: Madeline Andriesen and Shaye Otton, Communicating with the Stars

Individual Website First: Bailey Stuart, New Found Art; second: Brandon Garton, The Renaissance Man; third: Dylan Palmieri, The Titan of History

Group Website First: Destinee Cowart and Kayley Swinton, Field of Pain; second: Mikayla Kauffman and Lyric Wiggins, Fort Seward and the Boundary Thieves; third: Jacob Stigen and Colton Childress, War’s Written Strategies